stories

Soya landscapes

Argentina, also known before as the granary of the world, suffers from hunger. Since it started specializing in the production of soy and soy products, its nutritional sovereignty has been in peril. In this South American country, this was launched in 2003 to get Argentina out of the worst economic crisis in the country's history, by making it a supplier of basic raw material.
These immense lands are no longer occupied by gauchos and their cattle, but rather by spewing aircrafts saturated with Glifosates and Endosulfan who travel across the soybean fields that now belong to pools of investors. For the short-term profitability of the hectares, where the soybeans grow in a style known as "Roundup Ready" which involves genetic modifications to increase productivity, de-throning yesterday's smallholder farmers wasn't such a bad thing. Gauchos are no longer necessary for the operation of these extensive lands today, which are built for accommodating tenants. Nowadays, 4x4s suffice for such operations of exploitation, from a financial and administrative standpoint.
Soy culture is voracious and dries the fields in very little time. It causes imbalances in the ecosystem and leads to more deforestation. In many countries, this soy farming methodology is causing dispute and conflict.
Monsanto, an agriculture company known for organizing a military coup in Paraguay in May 2012, announced its investment of 1.67 billion dollars to build a plant for the manufacturing of GMO (genetically modified) seeds in the village of Malvinas Argentina, a suburb of the city of Cordoba. President Cristina Fernandez Kirchner was involved in the New York press conference presenting the project, despite the fact she also filed the first lawsuit in Cordoba in the name of fighting environmental pollution. The lawsuit was filed against two operators and a fumigator.

002_pon0506331.jpg

Soya harvest in Nueve de Julio. This area used to be of cattle industry before the arrival of soya in the 90's

002_pon0506331.jpg
004_pon0519548.jpg

Rural society in Lobos.

004_pon0519548.jpg
005_pon0523504.jpg

Water tank with can of chemical products for the culture of OGM Soya.

005_pon0523504.jpg
006_pon0513128.jpg

Portrait of Fabian Tomassi in his home. He is 48 years old. He works preparing the chemical products to make the spraying with the airplanes.

006_pon0513128.jpg
008_pon0418708.jpg

Ituzaingo neighborhoods in the city of Cordoba.

008_pon0418708.jpg
009_pon0484194.jpg

Anisacate. In September of 2013, the province of Cordoba has suffer the worst fire in the history of this area.

009_pon0484194.jpg
013_pon0485424.jpg

View of the field where Monsanto company begin with the project of a massive GMO plant.

013_pon0485424.jpg
014_pon0523503.jpg

View of the field where Monsanto company begin with the project of a massive GMO plant.

014_pon0523503.jpg
017_pon0484220.jpg

Smoke from fires covers Cordoba. In September 2013, the province suffered the worst fires in history. It is often said to explain the economic power of the province of Cordoba which the city is built with bricks of soybeans.... (+)

017_pon0484220.jpg
018_pon0418694.jpg

Ocular inspection in Ituzaingo neighbourhoods. This judgment against two rural producers who used agrochemicals in theirs fields is the first in South-America.

018_pon0418694.jpg
019_pon0523506.jpg

Soya fields around a cemetery in Basavilbaso.

019_pon0523506.jpg
015_pon0523367.jpg

Specimen of a soybean plant in the stand of the ministry of agriculture in official fair Tecnopolis. Argentina is dealing the new seed law with more control over patents.

015_pon0523367.jpg